Facebook messages gets an overhaul

The message system in Facebook is set to get a major overhaul. The new system aims to integrate all of your emails and instant messages with your Facebook friends into a single “inbox,” which Lifehacker has dubbed “one inbox to rule them all.” Instead of being sorted by subject, the new inbox will be sorted by person – what Facebook is calling the “social inbox” – the idea being to make your conversations with someone easier to find.

But Facebook are also stressing that their new message system isn’t just email – though you can still set it up to receive messages from contacts outside of Facebook – but a new way of envisaging and organising your written communications with your friends. It will be interesting to see what kind of take up this new message system has.

You can have a look at a few of the new features of Facebook’s new messaging system here and take a tour via video.

facebook founder smarter


A new film you may have seen lots of publicity for is the Social Network purporting to tell the story of the invention of facebook. Written by someone not on facebook, who doesn’t think facebook is a social good, it has been praised similarly by those who don’t use or like the technology.
Funnily enough >500 milion people do use the technology and see a use for it.

There are many people who dislike facebook, probably as many who used to express dislike for Microsoft and Apple, and their founders.
Bill Gates was the subject of much hate for many years, just as Mark Zuckerberg is now.

It seems that if someone uses technology, as Gates did, to increase worldwide productivity by at least 5% thus creating trillions of dollars in real benefits for economies, then he should be derided and attacked by those who haven’t and can’t create anything. Similarly Zuckerberg provides a free service for hundreds of millions of people and is attacked for it. There seems to be large numbers of people who spend their time whining about a) privacy (even though privacy is your own choice), b) owners getting rich, and c) that social media is anti-social.

If only these people would create a working alternative.

Skype and facebook

After Google recently started offering users of their gmail (email) service free video calls and cheap international phone calls, we knew Skype would have to do something new.

It firstly reduced its already phone low fees, and is now hooking up with facebook to offer:

With Facebook integration, you can:

◦see your Facebook News Feed in Skype
◦post status updates that can be synced with your Skype mood message
◦comment and like friends’ updates and wall posts
◦call and SMS your Facebook friends on their mobile phones and landlines
◦make a free Skype-to-Skype call if your Facebook friend is also a Skype contact

Facebook and privacy … around and around and around

When it comes to privacy, Facebook seems to have developed a program of responding to users’ concerns after the fact. Whilst I commend their desire to innovate and deliver new services to their users, a little forethought wouldn’t go astray. This infographic from Mashable says it nicely. Click on the image to enlarge.

Facebook and privacy

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Facebook accessories

How much time do you spend networking on Facebook? Would you like more Facebook in your life? Lucky for you, then, as there are a range of Facebook accessories to suit your everyday life – from coffee mugs and birthday cards, to wall decals and (my personal favourite) like and dislike stamps (what teacher worth their salt wouldn’t want to use these instead of the outdated pass/fail system?).

Like or dislike?

Like or dislike?

There are more Facebook accessories for your viewing – and consuming – pleasure over at Mashable.

More on Facebook privacy

What is all this hullabaloo over Facebook and privacy? Want to find out? Hear from the people on the inside (including Chris Cox, Facebook’s vice president), as well as a few tech experts. You can watch the full interview which appeared on PBS, read the transcript, or even listen to the MP3.